What Is Dutch Tilt? And How Can You Use It To Convey Speed In Motorsport Photography

by May 5, 2023

In motorsport photography, it’s hard to convey speed and motion in a still image, so we have to leverage different camera and capture techniques so that not every photo looks like a parked car. One of those techniques is the Dutch tilt.

So let’s have a look at what Dutch tilt is and how you can use it to convey speed and motion in your motorsport photography.

What Is Dutch Tilt?

Dutch tilt, also referred to as a canted angle, is a technique in which your camera is tilted off its horizontal axis, resulting in a slanted or diagonal composition. In essence, the image is deliberately not level.

This technique is often used in filmmaking and photography to create a sense of unease, disorientation, or instability. However, more importantly in motorsport photography, it can also be used to convey a sense of speed and motion in photos.

When used in motorsport photography, Dutch tilt creates a sense of dynamic movement through the image. By tilting the camera, the photographer can create a diagonal line with the horizon that gives the impression that the subject is moving quickly through the frame.

How To Use Dutch Tilt In Motorsport Photography

How To Use Dutch Tilt In Motorsport Photography

To use the Dutch tilt to convey speed in motorsport photography, there are a few things to keep in mind:

Capturing The Movement Of Vehicles

The Dutch tilt can be used to capture the sense of movement of vehicles in motorsport photography. By tilting the camera, you can create a diagonal line that gives the impression that the vehicle is moving quickly through the frame. This technique can be particularly effective in capturing the speed and energy of fast-moving vehicles.

Creating A Sense Of Drama

The Dutch tilt can also be used to create a sense of drama and excitement in motorsport photography. By tilting the camera, you can create a sense of tension and anticipation in the image, making the viewer feel as though they are part of the action.

Experiment With Different Angles

The Dutch tilt can be used in various ways to convey speed in photography. Try different angles to find the one that works best for your subject. A slight tilt can create a sense of speed, while a more extreme tilt can create a sense of chaos or danger. Just keep in mind that there is a fine line between looking fast and falling over.

Use The Rule Of Thirds

When using the Dutch tilt to convey speed, it’s important to place the subject in the right part of the frame. Placing the subject at one of the intersections of the rule of thirds can create a more balanced and dynamic composition. Check out this post if you’d like more detail on the rule of thirds.

Creating A Unique Composition

Finally, the Dutch tilt can be used to create a unique and interesting composition in motorsport photography. By experimenting with different angles and tilts, you can create images that are different from traditional sports photography and capture motorsport’s energy and excitement.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Dutch tilt is a powerful tool in motorsport photography that can be used to create a sense of motion, drama, and excitement. By experimenting with different angles and tilts, you can create unique and interesting compositions that capture the energy and intensity of motorsport.

Rhys Vandersyde

Rhys Vandersyde

I've been working as a motorsport photographer in Australia since 2012, building up my business InSyde Media. I am very fortunate that I have been able to work at all sorts of motorsport events including Supercars, F1 and WRC all over Australia and New Zealand. Also, check out my personal website where I document my travels and a few other things.

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