Why You Should Start A New Lightroom Catalog Each Year

Why You Should Start A New Lightroom Catalog Each Year

Why You Should Start A New Lightroom Catalog Each Year

Each race weekend often entails capturing, sorting through and editing a selection from thousands of photos. And while Adobe Lightroom (particularly Lightroom Classic) is one of the best tools for managing these vast collections of action shots, it also needs a little bit of management to keep your workflow efficient and organised.

If you are also using Adobe Lightroom to not only edit but organise your back catalogue of photos, one of the best practices that you can have as a motorsport photographer is to start a fresh new Lightroom Catalog each year.

Benefits of Starting a New Lightroom Catalog Annually

Improved Performance

It’s no secret that large Lightroom Catalogs can become sluggish over time, especially with the volume of high-resolution images we capture in motorsport photography. Simply starting a new catalogue each year is a great way to keep Lightroom running smoothly, reducing lag and improving your editing speed.

Over the years, Adobe has continued to optimise Lightroom to handle large catalogues. However, there is a noticeable performance difference when working within very large databases​. Starting a new one each year is a great, near-instant way to speed up your workflow, especially if you are trying to sort and edit photos within the tight schedule of a race weekend.

Enhanced Organisation

Starting a fresh new Adobe Lightroom Catalog at the beginning of each year or at least every motorsport season allows for the simple chronological organisation of your back catalogue of photos. This structure helps maintain a clean, streamlined workflow, which is beneficial not only when dealing with numerous images from various events throughout the year​ but also when you need to dig into your archive to find particular images from events years ago.

Simplified Backup and Archiving

Annual Lightroom Catalogs simplify your archival and backup processes. When combined with good file management processes, you can easily archive each year’s catalogue with its associated image files, ensuring they are easily accessible if needed.

I’ve found that archiving my photos and Lightroom catalogue files onto large NAS storage devices with built-in redundancies (along with some of my other backup processes) ensures that my photos are both easily accessible and protected from potential system failures and data loss.

Preset And Meta Tag Management

Starting a fresh Lightroom Catalog each year helps you manage your presets and meta tags more effectively. It can be very easy, especially when you are just starting out in motorsport photography, to try different ways to automate and organise your workflows.

A new catalogue gives you a fresh slate. It removes outdated or seldom-used items, keeping your workspace uncluttered and your tools relevant to current streamlined processes.

Things To Remember When Starting A New Lightroom Catalog Each Year

Naming Your Adobe Lightroom Catalog

One of the most important things to keep in mind is naming your Adobe Lightroom Catalogs so you can easily find the right one when you need to dig into your photo archives. Creating a new catalogue at the start of the year makes this easy by simply including the year in the name – something like Lightroom2024 or Motorsport2024.

Keep in mind that maintaining consistent naming and folder structure ensures continuity and a smooth transition between catalogues each year.

Transfer Presets and Meta Data Templates

Another tip to keep in mind is to make sure you back up and re-import your presets and metadata templates as needed. Each time you create a new Adobe Lightroom Catalog, you get a clean slate, which is great for cleaning out anything that doesn’t fit into your current workflow. But make sure you import (and for metadata, update) so you are ready for the first race of the new season.

Conclusion

Starting a new Lightroom Catalog each year is a simple yet effective way to keep Adobe Lightroom performing as expected while enhancing your workflow as a motorsport photographer and keeping your image archives well organised.

Rhys Vandersyde

Rhys Vandersyde

I've been working as a motorsport photographer in Australia since 2012, building up my business InSyde Media. I am very fortunate that I have been able to work at all sorts of motorsport events including Supercars, F1 and WRC all over Australia and New Zealand. Also, check out my personal website where I document my travels and a few other things.

RAW vs JPEG in Motorsport Photography: Which to Choose?

RAW vs JPEG in Motorsport Photography: Which to Choose?

RAW vs JPEG in Motorsport Photography: Which to Choose?

RAW or JPEG? This is probably the most hotly debated topic in photography amongst amateurs and professionals alike.

While RAW is usually the consensus general photography, the reality is that motorsport photography has its own nuances, making it important to weigh all the factors before you make a choice.

Let’s dive into the difference between the two image formats as well as some of the advantages and disadvantages of using either. Then I’ll share what I personally use for my motorsport photography and why.

RAW Photo Files

The RAW photo file format is exactly that: raw. It’s all the unprocessed information that is collected by the sensor of your camera when you press the shutter button.

In fact, it’s not really a photo file because only specialised photo editing software can open RAW image files, and each camera manufacturer has their own unique RAW format:

  • Canon DSLR – CR2
  • Canon Mirrorless (R Series) – CR3
  • Nikon – NEF
  • Sony A Series – ARW

Just to name a few. So you really need to think of a RAW file as a digital container with information that can be turned into a picture.

Additionally, RAW files are typically huge (especially on high-resolution camera models), so you have to make sure you’ve got plenty of space on your memory cards and drives.

Advantages of RAW

Capturing your photos in your camera’s native RAW format has plenty of benefits when it comes to post-processing images. Because the file contains all the information captured by your camera’s sensor, you have more flexibility to manipulate it to better showcase what you saw at the time—especially the highlights and shadows.

That said, RAW images straight out of the camera typically look flat compared to what you would have seen with your own eye because the camera hasn’t processed the image file in any way.

For some photographers, this can allow them to incorporate a range of different editing techniques to give the photo a more stylised look. In my case, as a motorsport photographer, it makes it easier for me to adjust the photo to look exactly how I saw it with my own eyes.

It’s well known that the dynamic range (seeing the details in both the highlights and shadows) of the human eye is much greater than what even the best and most expensive camera sensor can capture. But the RAW image format will give you the best chance to use the information that the sensor can capture to get the photo as true to life as possible and help you create some truly spectacular images.

Disadvantages of RAW

The main downside with RAW image files is that they’re very large, taking up a significant amount of digital storage in comparison to other compressed file formats.

Obviously, this makes your memory cards fill up faster (and hold fewer photos). It also means that transferring photos to your computer and even backing them up takes much longer.

As a motorsport photographer, this can be a significant limitation in trying to get photos out to clients quickly in between sessions.

It’s also worth noting that when taking a burst of shots (holding the shutter button to capture multiple shots during high-action moments), your camera will likely hit its internal memory buffer, trying to write so many photos to the memory cards – known as buffering.

JPEG Photo Files

JPEG is a file format that most of us are familiar with, even if you haven’t been into photography for very long. Not only is it the standard format that all modern digital cameras use to capture, process, and store their photos, regardless of manufacturer. It’s also the image standard that the majority of photos and images are displayed on the internet.

Advantages of JPEG

One of the key advantages of this format is that JPEG image is a smaller, compressed file format in comparison to RAW images. Significantly reducing the amount of digital storage required for the same number of images but also reducing the likelihood of running into issues like buffering.

Another key benefit of JPEG is that the camera has already processed the file for you, which means that from the moment you capture the photo, it can be used immediately.

To do this, your camera takes the information captured by your sensor when you press the shutter button, applies one of the inbuilt picture profiles (like a preset filter) to that information and records it as a JPEG—discarding the rest of the information that would otherwise be recorded in the RAW file.

The exact nature of the picture profiles available to you varies between different camera manufacturers, as does their level of customisation. But that’s, in short, what’s happening inside your camera to create JPEG images.

Disadvantages of JPEG

The key disadvantage of using a compressed file format like JPEG really only applies to professional photographers – the lack of digital information in the image file.

A JPEG discards a lot of extra information, particularly in the highlights and shadows, that is otherwise contained in a RAW file. This seriously limits the amount of data you have to work with when editing your image files, especially if you under or overexpose the photo in camera when taking the shot.

What Do I Use – RAW or JPEG?

As a professional motorsport photographer, which format do I use? Well, as it turns out, I use both RAW and JPEG.

Leaning on the benefits of both file formats, I’ve actually got my cameras configured to record both RAW and JPEG files for each photo I capture.

Sure, this means that I need a lot more storage, but I can leverage all of the advantages of both to ensure a timely yet professional delivery of photos to my clients throughout a race weekend.

When it comes to editing my photos, obviously RAW as my preferred file format. The versatility that it offers once I get my images onto my computer to deliver the best quality image to my clients is key. Once a race has been run, I’ve got what I’ve got – I can’t go back and re-shoot it. So, the data captured in a RAW format image gives me more bandwidth to process the photo, especially if I’ve slightly underexposed or overexposed the image in changeable conditions.

However, utilising the JPEG images straight out of the camera also allows me to get images out to customers almost instantly. Be it a competitor’s need to update social media or a news outlet’s requirement for photos to support breaking stories, the speed of delivery often outweighs the need for a perfectly edited photo.

Everything with photography is a balancing act, but taking advantage of the benefits of both RAW and JPEG allows me to meet my client’s immediate need to have instant access to images while also being able to deliver a much more polished, higher-resolution photo with less time pressure.

That said, I can understand, with limitations in file storage, that capturing both might not be the ideal solution for everyone.

Neither RAW nor JPEG is the perfect format for all situations. You’ll have to experiment with both image formats to find which suits your particular workflow best. However. as you progress in your journey to become a motorsport photographer, you will discover which works best for you in different situations.

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Rhys Vandersyde

Rhys Vandersyde

I've been working as a motorsport photographer in Australia since 2012, building up my business InSyde Media. I am very fortunate that I have been able to work at all sorts of motorsport events including Supercars, F1 and WRC all over Australia and New Zealand. Also, check out my personal website where I document my travels and a few other things.

How To Process Photos and Deliver Them Quickly To Clients

How To Process Photos and Deliver Them Quickly To Clients

How To Process Photos and Deliver Them Quickly To Clients

In the modern age of instant updates through social media, getting your images out to your customers quickly is arguably more important than how good they are. Just ask any Team PR with a camera or Journalist on a tight deadline.

Mastering the art of processing and delivering photos efficiently is a crucial skill for any professional motorsport photographer. Let’s have a look at the steps you can take to streamline your workflow to ensure swift photo processing and delivery.

Only Capture The Photos You Need

It goes without saying that the fewer photos you take, the less photos you need to sort through. This, above every other tip I’ll mention in this post, will significantly speed up the process of getting your photos out to your customers.

When you are new to motorsport photography, it can seem essential to get every photo of every car all the time. However, with experience, you’ll learn that knowing who you are shooting for and the photos you really need to capture will allow you to not only streamline your time trackside but also once you get back to the media centre to process and deliver your images.

Downloading Photos

How To Process Photos and Deliver Them Quickly To Clients

One of the biggest hold-ups in getting photos out to your customers is downloading your images once you get back to the media centre.

Fortunately, with an investment in technology and good processes, this is also the easiest area to make improvements to get your images out to your customers faster.

Technology

From a technology standpoint, this is where good-quality memory cards and card readers come into their own. In much the same way that memory card write speeds are critical for capturing the action, their read speeds are equally important.

By the time you get back to the media centre, you will have numerous gigabytes of data to download onto your computer; slow cards and readers (even the USB cables you use with your readers) can all add bottlenecks to slow down this process.

Did you know that USB 3.2 offers transfer rates of 10Gbps, but if you are using a USB 2.0 cable, you’ll be limited to just 480Mbps? That might not sound like much, but it’s the difference between transferring 10Gb of data in seconds, not minutes. But again, that’s one of a number of factors that play into how quickly you can download your images.

In my experience, I’ve found that sticking with one good quality brand for my memory cards and card readers ensures that I have consistent performance. For me, that’s ProGrade Digital. But I’m sure other people have their own brand allegiances.

Another thing to keep in mind when it comes to transfer speeds is that SSDs are significantly faster than traditional hard drives. I try to make sure that I’ve always got room on my computer’s internal SSD storage to store the day’s photos (which is harder than you think when you can capture up to 10,000 images in a day). However, to do that usually means migrating the previous day’s photos onto an external SSD at the start of each new day.

Again, there are a few different brands of external SSD manufacturers, but I’ve found that Samsung’s SSDs are the best-performing.

Processes

In addition to the technology improvements, a couple of simple processes can also streamline your download process.

I know everyone is different, but what I’ve found works best for me is making sure I have a card reader for each camera I’m carrying (usually two, but occasionally three if I’m doing long exposures or remote shooting, etc.).

Obviously, the amount of USB ports you have on your computer can limit this, but being able to download all of my cards at the same time allows me to use the time that I would be waiting for them to download them individually to quickly eat some food or grab a drink etc. Making that time a little more productive than just sitting and waiting. Those precious few minutes are invaluable if you are photographing multiple categories on a busy race program. Then, once they have downloaded, I get straight into sorting and processing.

If you are downloading multiple cards at the same time (and not formatting them once they have been downloaded, which I don’t for this reason), just make sure that the card goes back into the same camera it came out of. Otherwise, you can run into weird little issues, particularly sporadically duplicated file name issues.

Picking Photos

Once the photos are on my computer, I open them into Adobe Lightroom Classic and apply a preset on import. I find this process faster and much more reliable using Lightroom to import the images directly. There are many other software tools out there, but for me, the balance between sorting, editing and uploading means that Adobe Lightroom Classic is what works best for me.

Adding the preset on import means that 70%-90% of my edit is already done before I’ve even started sorting through the photos, so I’m seeing what my customers will ultimately see when I’m picking out their photos. It does add a little bit of time to the import process, but it significantly speeds up the edit and upload process because the bulk of the work is already done.

When I’m sorting through my photos, I use a system of colour tags and star ratings to group photos that can be assigned by quick keyboard shortcuts as I’m scrolling through the images, and I can then use the filter options in Lightroom to focus in on those shots for the final edit and export.

For the most part, I can quickly skim through my photos and determine which ones will be best for each customer from the thumbnail preview. But that’s a skill I’ve built up over time, and knowing how I’ve captured the shots to ensure they are usable while trackside. Obviously, super slow pans and other arty shots need a bit more attention to ensure they are up to my standard, which does slow down the sorting process. But I know that when I take them.

Only Edit What You Need

As I just mentioned, with the photos I need to get out to customers sorted using the colour tags and star ratings, I can use the filters in Adobe Lightroom to focus on only the shots I need.

At this point, I can batch-edit photos to make as many additional quick adjustments as needed – at least a quick white balance and crop if required – before exporting them out for my customers.

I don’t do anything else with the other photos I’ve captured. I don’t delete the bad shots. I don’t do any additional edits. I don’t even pick out my personal favourites for social media. Nothing.

Any of that additional work waits until the end of the day (well, usually late into the evening) once all of my customers have all of their photos from the event.

Multiple Internet Connections

Once the shots have been exported, I’m done, and I can either get back trackside for the next group of sessions or head back to the hotel and get some dinner.

However, that doesn’t mean that the process of getting photos out quickly has finished. Uploading photos to the internet so that your customers can actually use them is a big part of the whole process. This is where having a choice of internet connections is crucial.

Some tracks and media centres provide internet connections, which can be great. However, at the end of the day, when everyone else is uploading their images (or worse, videos), this can (and usually does) slow down dramatically.

On the flip side, having your own 5G wireless hotspot can be great. However, this is reliant on mobile coverage from the provider, and there is a big crowd who are also using the mobile network this will also slow down (and become unusable) until that crowd disperses.

I’ve found the best thing I can do to ensure my photos upload quickly is to have a choice of internet connections that I can use depending on what is working at the time. Sometimes, at particularly big events with large crowds, that means leaving the venue before the photos have been uploaded. A 30-minute drive can potentially save hours of upload time depending on what is happening at the circuit, particularly when there is a post-race concert.

Sending Images Directly From Camera

How To Process Photos and Deliver Them Quickly To Clients

Alternatively, to expedite the delivery process, you can consider sending images directly from your camera.

Back to my opening point, getting images out quickly is often more important than the overall quality of the photos, especially in a world of instant social media updates and editorial websites.

With that in mind, most modern intermediate to professional-grade cameras have some sort of inbuilt ability to wirelessly transfer your photos to or via a mobile device. What that ability is and how you can use it will ultimately depend on the camera that you have.

And while Lightroom and Photoshop exist as mobile versions, this method won’t really allow you to edit the images properly. There are also a number of other limitations to consider (like internet speed and access, as I just mentioned). However, in terms of your customers not having to wait all day to get images from you, this can be a very good stop-gap solution.

How do I do it? I send smaller, unedited jpeg versions directly from my cameras to a website via FTP to allow my customers to securely access my images while I’m still trackside. This is especially handy if I need to cover multiple categories on the same race weekend, taking the pressure off to get back to the media centre.

To facilitate this, I use PhotoShelter, as it is the only reliable service that I have found that meets my security and FTP upload requirements.

Wrap Up

In the fast-paced world of motorsport photography, the ability to process and deliver photos quickly is an essential skill.

If you, too, want to streamline your workflow and impress your clients with prompt image delivery, I would strongly consider adding some of these elements to your workflow.

Rhys Vandersyde

Rhys Vandersyde

I've been working as a motorsport photographer in Australia since 2012, building up my business InSyde Media. I am very fortunate that I have been able to work at all sorts of motorsport events including Supercars, F1 and WRC all over Australia and New Zealand. Also, check out my personal website where I document my travels and a few other things.

How To Install Lightroom Presets

How To Install Lightroom Presets

How To Install Lightroom Presets

In the fast-moving world of motorsport, getting your photos out quickly is just as important as what you capture on track. That’s where Adobe Lightroom Presets come in!

While there is a variety of different software out there to edit photos, in my experience Adobe Lightroom is one of the best options for quickly sorting and batch-editing your photos. Enabling rapid distribution to customers, especially during a busy motorsport event.

One of the key features of Lightroom that makes it so helpful is the ability to apply a particular preset on the import of your photos so that you only need to make minor additional adjustments before exporting the photos out to your customers.

You can fast-track this process by creating your own presets or buy purchasing them from one of your favourite photographers. I’ve made my motorsport presets available here if you want to speed up your learning. Just keep in mind that certain presets are designed for that photographer’s style of shooting, so the results on your photos might differ slightly.

While I typically use Lightroom Classic due to the sheer volume of photos I capture, this process of using presets is exactly the same if you choose to use Lightroom CC as well. Just the process of installing them is slightly different.

Now that you understand the benefits of Lightroom presets to speed up your workflow and you’ve sourced some to install. Let’s have a look at how you go about it.

How to Install Presets in Lightroom Classic

Step 1: Download the Presets

The first step is to download the presets you want to use. In addition to my presets, there are a number of other places to find Presets, including your favourite photographer’s websites and online creative marketplaces like Etsy. Once you have downloaded the presets, make sure they are unzipped (.xml files) and saved in a location that is easy to access, such as your desktop or a specific folder.

Step 2: Open Lightroom Classic

Open Lightroom Classic and navigate to the Develop module, typically located as a tab at the top of the screen.

Step 3: Locate the Presets Panel

In the left-hand panel, you will see a tab labelled “Presets”. If you can’t see it, click on the triangle icon on the left-hand side of the screen to expand the panel.

Step 4: Click on the “+” Icon

In the Presets panel, click on the “+” icon, which is located at the top right of the panel.

Step 5: Select “Import Presets”

A drop-down menu will appear. Select “Import Presets” from the list.

Step 6: Navigate to the Presets Folder

A Finder (Mac) or Explorer (Windows) window will appear. Navigate to the folder where you saved your downloaded presets and select them.

Step 7: Click “Import”

Once you have selected your presets, click “Import”. Your presets will now be available under User Presets in the Presets panel to use with your photos.

How to Install Presets in Lightroom CC

Step 1: Download the Presets

Much like Lightroom Classic, the first step is to download the presets you want to use. In addition to my presets, there are a number of other places to find presets, including your favourite photographer’s websites and online creative marketplaces like Etsy. Once you have downloaded the presets, make sure they are unzipped and saved in a location that is easy to access, such as your desktop or a specific folder.

Step 2: Open Lightroom CC

Open Lightroom CC and navigate to the Edit module. This is indicated by the “Slider Button” on the right-hand side panel – Lines with circles that look like Lightroom edit slider controls. Or by pressing E on your keyboard.

Step 3: Open the Presets Panel

In the right-hand panel, you will see a button labelled “Presets” underneath the Edit title. This will expand the “Presets” panel.

Step 4: Click on the “…” Icon

In the Presets panel, click on the “…” three-dot icon, which is located at the top right of the panel.

Step 5: Select “Import Presets”

A drop-down menu will appear. Select “Import Presets” from the list.

Step 6: Navigate to the Presets Folder

A Finder (Mac) or Explorer (Windows) window will appear. Navigate to the folder where you saved your downloaded presets and select them.

Step 7: Click “Import”

Once you have selected your presets, click “Import”. Your presets will now be available in the Yours section of the Presets panel.

To install presets in Lightroom CC Mobile, follow the same steps with Lightroom CC on your computer, which will sync them to your other devices via your Adobe Creative Cloud account.

Rhys Vandersyde

Rhys Vandersyde

I've been working as a motorsport photographer in Australia since 2012, building up my business InSyde Media. I am very fortunate that I have been able to work at all sorts of motorsport events including Supercars, F1 and WRC all over Australia and New Zealand. Also, check out my personal website where I document my travels and a few other things.

Do I Really Need To Backup My Photos?

Do I Really Need To Backup My Photos?

Do I Really Need To Backup My Photos?

If you’re starting out as a motorsport photographer, there’s one key thing you need to do on a regular basis, and that’s backing up your photos.

Not having multiple copies of your images across hardware and the internet is the number one rookie mistake. Because let’s face it: digital photography is amazing, but unlike film rolls and print images, once the digital photo is lost, it’s lost forever.

This is especially important for motorsport photography. If you took a photo of a landscape and lost the image, you could potentially go back to the same location and get another similar. However with motorsport, you are capturing a moment in time that can never truly be replicated again.

In action sports, you only get the one opportunity to capture the one moment. If you lose those photos for any reason, you can’t simply go and recreate those shots.

In addition, you want to be regularly backing up your photos for the future. You never know when you’ll get a request for something you’ve captured at an event previously. As an example, I often get requests for photos captured at events several years ago.

So how should you back up your images, and what are the best tools and software to use?

Cloud vs Hardware

Ideally, you want three separate copies of all your images, across three different places. I would recommend that you have one copy easily accessible either on your computer or an external hard drive. Another on a separate hard drive or NAS storage device. And one more on the internet/in the cloud.

Remember that as a motorsport photographer, the sheer volume of photos you capture during an event will be enormous. I’ll often capture between 80Gb and 150GB of image files shooting in RAW in a single day at a motorsport event.

For this reason, simply dumping all your photos on your laptop won’t do the trick. For one, there simply won’t be enough space, and for another, if you lose or damage your laptop, your images will be gone, too. If you do store images on your laptop, at least make sure it’s an SSD (solid state drive) as these are typically more stable and reliable.

Cloud storing (that is, backing up your files on the internet) offers a lot of flexibility and it’s dead easy to use. However, once you consider the amount of storage you’ll need, the costs might add up pretty quickly.

Having your own backup hardware is cheaper and often more convenient, but you need to manage that much more carefully.

That’s why what I tend to do is use Dropbox to send and backup the image files delivered to customers while also utilizing several NAS (network attached storage devices) to store and back up my files. Finally, I also use a portable hard drive system to maintain backups so I’ve always got at least 3 copies of all my image files and I can always get them back if need be.

This may appear like overkill to you, but this foolproof system allows me to always have the images I need at hand, and I never lose files. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be the one tell a customer they’ve got no images from an event. Regardless the reason.

Best Cloud Options for Photographers

If you’re trying to choose the best cloud option to store your images online, Dropbox is a reasonably priced solution. Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive could also work; Smugmug is another good place to store, showcase, and sell your images all on one site.

However, once you start storing Terabytes worth of data, then I would suggest that you look at Amazon Cloud Services to save on costs.

Best Hardware for Storing Your Photos

Volume, volume, volume: I always make sure I have enough memory cards so I don’t need to format them during an event.

I have enough cards to cover a four-day race meeting so that I can keep all my files on my cards (as well as on my computer) until I can get back to the office to complete the backup of all my image files to my NAS system and portable hard drives.

Always carry as many memory cards as you can afford to make sure you never run out of storage, and that you’ve got plenty of backup space.

Another solution is to have multiple hard drives with you to back up your files as you go. However, this can be time-consuming in the fast-paced environment of a media center, particularly while you are trying to get photos out to customers quickly.

How to Organize Your Backup Photos

Last but not least, your photos need to be well-organized. Don’t just dump everything into the same folder, drive, or card – finding the photo you need quickly will be impossible if you do this. Use a system, stick to it, and organize your images to prevent future headaches.

For example, I use a daily photo folder system that allows me to easily identify the event I’m looking for.

I use the following structure so I know exactly which photos belong to which event:

YYYY-MM-DD EVENT NAME – EVENT LOCATION

For example, an event in March at Sydney Motorsport Park might look a little like this:

2021-03-25 Test Event – Sydney Motorsport Park.

You don’t need to use my system, but do create your own and stick to it if you want your images backed up, organized, and ready to go whenever a customer or an editor comes calling.

How do you backup your photos? Have you had any mishaps with lost photos, and regretted not being more cautious? Drop a comment below and let me know!

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Rhys Vandersyde

Rhys Vandersyde

I've been working as a motorsport photographer in Australia since 2012, building up my business InSyde Media. I am very fortunate that I have been able to work at all sorts of motorsport events including Supercars, F1 and WRC all over Australia and New Zealand. Also, check out my personal website where I document my travels and a few other things.

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